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  • Juliette Quincey

Don't Let Time With The boss, Be a Loss


I’m sure many of us have experienced the situation where, in our heads, and out loud no doubt in the form of complaining to our friends/family/colleagues, we have felt aggrieved, or unhappy about a workplace situation. Then you have a meeting /supervision or informal, ad-hock chat with your line manager/supervisor and all though you bring up some of the issues, you walk away feeling nothing’s changed and absolutely no confidence that nothing will! Or the feeling that you haven’t got across all your concerns/issues and worst still, that you haven’t truly been heard or taken seriously! Ok so if you have ever been in this very frustrating situation and want to achieve progress or resolution via a meeting with your line manager/supervisor, so here are the few things that I have used in the past and that you can put into action to a successful meeting or supervision.

PIN THEM DOWN

There’s a saying that everyone has their fifteen minutes of fame, well you may not need fifteen of fame, but what you do need, if you have an issue and you need to present it to someone who can play a part in resolving it, is fifteen minutes (give or take) of their undivided attention. So, forget, approaching them as soon as they arrive, erupting like a volcano with your grievances, or stopping them on the corridor, to whinge about ongoing circumstances. Request a time slot, ask what time will be best for them, don’t make it a frightening prospect for them (yes managers can and will avoid meet ups/supervision if they think it’s going to be a challenging one), who wants that shit. So make it an appealing invite (can I have a meet with you tomorrow, My supervision is due anyway, and it will only take 15 minutes plus I have got a few idea’s) sounding up beat and assertive will give them an idea that this will be a meeting/supervision that will not be challenging or stressful, and therefore increase the chances and commitment of them really creating time space for you.

KNOW YOUR OUTCOME

Be clear in your head, what it is you want to achieve by the time you walk out the door following your meeting/supervision. And in fact write it down, it needn’t be an essay, just a short sentence on what you want to have been achieved by the end of the meeting. As I often say, if you don’t know what your aiming for you will easily, and most likely miss the mark…because there isn’t one.

DON’T JUST FIRE OFF PROBLEMS, ARM YOURSELF WITH SOLUTIONS

So many times, it’s so easy to think things like “well they are the manager/supervisor, it’s their job to sort things out” and expect the line manager to provide the answer! And it may be that they can provide the answer, But here’s the thing. if your manager/supervisor isn’t experiencing the problem themselves and it doesn’t affect them, they may not be fully invested or motivated to solve the issue. Before you go into the meeting/supervision, don’t just take the problem with you; think before hand of all the options that can be the solution, not leaving out the consequences. Doing this does not mean you are doing your bosses job, it means you are a creative, solution focused productive member of a team. Consider all the options to the issue and write them down; even though you have an issue, go in positive. Present your potential solutions to your boss/supervisor and give them the opportunity the trial and error them within an agreed timescale.

LEVERAGE AND BARGANING

Ok so I’ve just spoken about going in with solutions, not just problems, and leverage and bargaining I feel is part of that. Bargaining is an old age action. What can you give in return for what you want? When you previously thought about the possible solutions, also think about what benefits those solutions can bring for, not only yourself, but to your boss and others you work with. Brain storm each one, listing the possible benefits for each party.

FOLLOW UP/FEED BACK

Ok and just one last thing, don’t forget to get confirmation on time and actions. Ask yourself; How will you know you have been heard and when will you know action has been taken? Ask and take a note of this if need be, make sure they write this down, you could say something like, “might be useful to write this down”, and if a timescale is stablished for an action or change, then arrange for a second meeting/supervision, a few days after.

Hope this has been useful for you and if you would like to find out more or arrange coaching for yourself or your employees then please contact me via the contact page

JQ


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